More
Close

Top 25 Power Foods for Diabetes

The best foods for diabetes are most often whole foods that are not processed, such as fruits and vegetables. Including these extra-healthy power foods in your diet will help you meet your nutritional needs as well as lower your risk of diabetes complications such as heart disease. Of course, the foods on this list shouldn't be the only foods you eat, but incorporating some or all into your diabetes meal plan will help improve your overall health.
  • The Best Foods for Diabetes

    If you already follow a healthful meal plan filled with whole grains, fresh fruits and veggies, and lean protein, congratulations! You're on your way to a long, healthy life and are taking a major step in controlling your weight and blood sugar levels. Plus, you're probably already eating a bunch of the foods on this list.

    For those who are taking the baby-steps approach to eating better, this list is even more helpful. Not only are these power foods high in fiber, antioxidants, and vitamins and minerals, they're also familiar and easy to find. That means you don't have to hunt down any exotic ingredients or shop at specialty grocery stores to find foods that will help you get on track with a healthful meal plan.

    FREE! Diabetic Breakfast Recipes Mini Cookbook

  • Apples

    An apple a day keeps the doctor away -- specifically the cardiologist. A 2012 study at Ohio State University published in the Journal of Functional Foods found that eating just one apple a day for four weeks lowered LDL (bad) cholesterol by 40 percent. The professor leading the study explained that not all antioxidants are created equal, and that a particular type of antioxidant in apples had a profound effect on lowering LDLs, a contributor to heart disease. The study was funded in part by a grant from the U.S. Apple Association, among other supporters.

    More reasons why apples are good for a diabetes diet.

    This crunchy fruit also appears to offer protection against diabetes. The Harvard School of Public Health examined the diets of 200,000 people and found that those who reported eating five or more apples a week had a 23 percent lower risk of developing type 2 diabetes compared with subjects who did not eat any apples.

    More good news: A medium-size apple contains 3 grams of fiber, which includes both soluble and insoluble fiber. How 'bout them apples?

    Do remember, however, that one small apple has about 15 grams of carb. Some of the large apples in the grocery store are equivalent to two servings of fruit.

    Get our best apple recipes!

  • Asparagus

    Based on taste alone, asparagus is a favorite food for many. But you'll really love that it's a nonstarchy vegetable with only 5 grams of carb, 20 calories, and almost 2 grams of dietary fiber per serving. It's especially high in an antioxidant called glutathione, which plays a key role in easing the effects of aging and many diseases, including diabetes, heart disease, and cancer.

    Learn more about asparagus!

    One example is the preliminary research reported in 2012 in the British Journal of Nutrition, which suggests that asparagus can help keep blood sugar levels in check and increase insulin production.

    Another plus for asparagus is its folate content -- a 1/2-cup serving, or about six 1/2-inch spears, provides 33 percent of the 400 micrograms of folate recommended daily. The American Heart Association advises eating foods containing folate and other B vitamins to help lower homocysteine levels, a risk factor for coronary heart disease.

    Enjoy these asparagus recipes:

    Sauteed Shrimp and Asparagus 

    Asparagus with Goat Cheese

     

  • Avocados

    Avocados are known for their heart-healthy monounsaturated fat content. When substituting these fats for saturated fat, they can improve cholesterol levels, decreasing your risk of heart disease, according to the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics.

    Six reasons to eat avocados!

    There is even a positive connection between avocados and diabetes: The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition published a study in 2008 that found that women who reported eating the highest amount of good fats -- unsaturated vegetable fats, such as those found in avocados -- were 25 percent less likely to develop type 2 diabetes compared with women who ate the least amount.

    Technically, an avocado is a fruit, but because of its high fat content -- 4 grams in 1/4 of a medium-size avocado -- it should be treated like a fat. That same serving of avocado contains a respectable 2 grams of fiber with just 2 carb grams.

    In addition to guacamole, you can use avocados in salads and sandwiches, or make a salad dressing by pureeing it with a little lemon juice, garlic, and olive oil.

    If you want to speed up the ripening process, put an under-ripe avocado in a brown paper bag, close it, and leave it on your kitchen counter for a day or two.

    Click here for two awesome avocado recipes:

    Cobb Salad

    Roasted Poblano Guacamole

     

  • Beans

    There may just be something to that old line, "Beans, beans, the magical fruit." Of course, you probably know that beans are high in fiber and a good source of protein, but now there are even more reasons to include them in a diabetic diet. In a 2012 study, researchers found that eating about a cup of legumes daily resulted in better blood sugar control (for both blood glucose and A1C) and lower blood pressure.

    Watch: Why beans truly have super powers.

    Further, consuming more fiber may lower the risk of a first-time stroke, according to the American Heart Association (AHA) journal Stroke. The researchers concluded that every 7-gram increase in total dietary fiber was associated with a 7 percent lower risk of a first-time stroke.

    The AHA recommends getting at least 25 grams of dietary fiber daily. A 1/2-cup serving of cooked navy beans has more than 9 grams of fiber and counts as one starch and one lean meat.

    Other delicious varieties of beans include black, kidney, garbanzo, white, lima, and pinto. You can cook dry beans or use canned beans, but remember to look for low-sodium versions.

    Try using beans as your main protein source a couple of times a week plain, in salads, in soups, or as a substitute for ground beef in Mexican dishes, such as bean tacos or burritos. Beans are good for your wallet, too -- they are about the cheapest protein source around.

    Try these fiber-rich bean recipes:

    Fix-and-Forget White Bean Chili

    Beef and Black Bean Wraps

  • Blueberries

    Blueberries are part of the family of fruits containing flavonoids, known for their many health benefits, including heart health. In addition, blueberries' high fiber content may reduce the risk of diabetes and cognitive decline, and help keep blood sugar more level, says Joanne M. Gallivan, MS, RD, director of the National Diabetes Education Program at the National Institutes of Health. "Recent studies have also shown that berries have an anticancer effect by inhibiting tumor growth and decreasing inflammation," Gallivan says.

    See the hidden power of blueberries.

    One of the specific types of antioxidants found in blueberries are anthocyanins, which give them their blue color. Recent research links eating foods rich in anthocyanins with a lower risk of type 2 diabetes. The researchers found that people who ate two or more servings of blueberries weekly reduced their risk of developing type 2 by 23 percent, even after adjusting for age, weight, and lifestyle factors. While these results are promising, it should be noted that further studies are needed to determine the causal relationship between eating blueberries and decreased chances of developing diabetes.

    Enjoy fresh blueberries May through October, or buy frozen berries anytime.

    Here are two of our top blueberry recipes:

    Blueberry Buckwheat Pancakes

    Peach-Blueberry Parfaits

  • Broccoli

    This nonstarchy vegetable makes just about every superfood list, and it's easy to see why. For starters, it has more vitamin C per 100 grams than an orange, plus it's high in the antioxidant beta-carotene, which the body uses to make vitamin A. This dark green vegetable's vitamin A power promotes healthy vision, teeth, bones, and skin. It is also rich in folate and fiber, all with minimal calories and carbs.

    Can broccoli reverse cell damage from high blood sugar?

    Broccoli is a member of the cruciferous vegetable family, which includes other veggies such as Brussels sprouts, cabbage, cauliflower, and bok choy. What makes this class of veggies unique is the high levels of sulfur-containing compounds known as glucosinolates. Perhaps better known for their potential anticancer effects, these compounds may also have a role in reducing heart disease risk and heart-related deaths. In a study reported in The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition in 2011, researchers found that cruciferous vegetable consumption was associated with a reduced risk of death from heart disease. Their recommendation: "Increase consumption of vegetables, particularly cruciferous vegetables and fruit, to promote cardiovascular healthy and overall longevity."

    One serving of broccoli is 1 cup raw or 1/2 cup cooked. You can enjoy it raw with hummus or a low-calorie dressing, or use it chopped in eggs, pizzas, pastas, salads, and stir-fries. The key to great-tasting cooked broccoli: Don't overcook it. The stem portion should be barely tender, and the broccoli should be bright green.

    Enjoy these delicious broccoli recipes:

    Beef and Broccoli 

    Bow Tie Pasta with Chicken and Broccoli

  • Carrots

    Cooked or raw, carrots are a healthy addition to any meal plan. While cooked carrots have the rich texture of starchy vegetables, such as potatoes, they are classified as nonstarchy veggies because they don't contain a lot of carbohydrate. A 1-cup serving of raw carrots has about 5 grams of carb, as does a 1/2-cup cooked serving. According to the American Diabetes Association, five baby carrots are considered a "free food" and do not need to be counted in a meal plan.

    Can carrots raise blood sugar?

    Carrots are noted for their high vitamin A, made from the antioxidant beta-carotene in carrots. This vitamin is necessary for good vision and immune function, and it may help prevent the development of some cancers, according to the Mayo Clinic.

    There are now even more good reasons to eat your carrots: According to a study reported in 2013 from the Stanford University School of Medicine, beta-carotene may even help lower the risk of developing type 2 diabetes among people who have a genetic predisposition for the disease.

    Enjoy raw carrots with a low-calorie dip or salad dressing; shred them for salads; finely chop them and add to soup, chili, or spaghetti sauce; or roast them in the oven. Pureed cooked carrots also make satisfying soups.

    Enjoy our best carrot recipes!

  • Cranberries

    They're not just for holiday dinners anymore. There are now good reasons to enjoy this power-packed fruit year-round. Although best known for helping to prevent urinary tract infections, cranberries -- with their abundant phytonutrients, including anthocyanins -- may be especially beneficial in a diabetic meal plan.

    There is also a growing body of evidence that the antioxidants found in cranberries may reduce the risk of heart disease by reducing LDL (bad) cholesterol, maintaining or improving HDL (good) cholesterol, and lowering blood pressure.

    Fresh cranberries, which contain the highest levels of beneficial nutrients, are at their peak from October through December. As cranberries grow wild in the northern regions of the United States, they are readily available in all regions during the fall months and almost always are sold packaged in plastic bags. Choose bags of cranberries with firm, plump, red berries with no signs of leakage. Uncooked cranberries can be kept in the refrigerator about a week. One cup of whole, unsweetened berries has only 51 calories and 13 grams of carb, and they are a good source of vitamin C. Fortunately, you can freeze cranberries to use throughout the year.

    Serving sizes for different forms of cranberries:

    1/2 cup fresh
    2 tablespoons dried
    1/2 cup cranberry juice cocktail
    1-1/2 cups light cranberry juice cocktail

    Add cranberries to smoothies, salads, chutneys, or muffins. Be sure to look for reduced-sugar or sugar-free cranberry products.

    Check out these great cranberry recipes:

    Tangerine-Cranberry Relish

    Cran-Raspberry Shortcakes

     

  • Fish

    The 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommends eating fish twice a week. Unlike many meats, seafood is low in unhealthy saturated fat and cholesterol, plus it's a good source of omega-3 fatty acids -- particularly fatty fish such as salmon, mackerel, herring, lake trout, sardines, halibut, and albacore tuna. According to the American Heart Association, omega-3 fatty acids lower the risk of arrhythmias (abnormal heartbeats), which can lead to sudden death. Omega-3s also decrease triglyceride levels, slow the growth rate of atherosclerotic plaque, lower blood pressure, and curb inflammation. Further, ongoing studies are evaluating their effectiveness for decreasing the risk for Alzheimer's disease and dementia.

    Five things you might not know about fish!

    One downside of eating fish is some kinds may contain high levels of mercury, notably shark, swordfish, king mackerel, and tilefish. While children and pregnant women are advised by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to avoid eating these varieties, the benefits of eating fish outweigh the potential risks for middle-aged and older men and women, as long as the amount of fish is eaten within FDA and Environmental Protection Agency guidelines. Eating a variety of seafood helps minimize the amount of mercury in your diet.

    The serving-size guideline for seafood is the same for meat and poultry: 3 ounces. Even though fish might be more expensive than other protein sources, preparing it at home rather than ordering it in a restaurant keeps the cost down.

    Try our favorite salmon recipes!

    Get fish and seafood recipes!

  • Flaxseed

    Sometimes good things come in threes, and that's certainly true of flaxseed:

    1. It contains alpha-linolenic acid (ALA), which can be converted into omega-3 fatty acids, offering similar benefits of those found in fish.

    2. Flaxseed is a good source of lignans, antioxidants that have been shown to help prevent heart disease and cancer, according to the Cleveland Clinic.

    3. A 1-tablespoon serving of whole flaxseed contains a respectable 3 grams of fiber, both soluble and insoluble, and just 3 grams of carb -- but note that it does have 55 calories.

    How to incorporate flaxseed into your diabetes diet.

    Recent research makes a strong case for including flaxseed in a diabetic diet:

    • The National Institutes of Health states that flaxseed is possibly effective for lowering hemoglobin A1C in people with type 2 diabetes, a measure of average blood sugar levels over two to three months.

    • In a small study reported in the Journal of Dietary Supplements in 2011, researchers found that when people with type 2 diabetes supplemented their diets with ground flaxseed, fasting blood glucose levels decreased 19.7 percent, total cholesterol decreased more than 14.3 percent, triglycerides lowered 1.5 percent, and low-density LDL (bad) cholesterol declined 21.8 percent.

    • In an analysis of 28 scientific studies, researchers concluded flaxseed significantly reduced total and LDL (bad) cholesterol.

    • Another study found that people who added 30 grams of ground flaxseed to their diets experienced a drop of 15 points in systolic and 8 points in diastolic blood pressure levels.

    While there are no specific recommendations, most health authorities recommend eating 1-2 tablespoons of flaxseed daily, either in whole or ground (milled) form. Enjoy the nutty-flavor seed on cereal, on salads, or mixed into quick breads and smoothies.

    Our flaxseed faves include:

    Salmon and Spinach Salad with Flaxseed Dressing

    Toasted Oat Muesli

  • Garlic

    Garlic, the edible bulb from a plant in the lily family, has served as both a medicine and flavoring agent in cooking for thousands of years. It has been used to treat high cholesterol, heart disease, high blood pressure, and cancers. So does it really work? Here is what the current science says, according to the National Institutes of Health:

    • Some evidence indicates consuming garlic can slightly lower blood cholesterol levels for short-term use, but other studies conclude it has no effect.

    • Preliminary research suggests garlic may slow the development of atherosclerosis, a condition that can lead to heart disease or stroke.

    • Evidence suggests garlic may slightly lower blood pressure, especially in people who have high blood pressure.

    More reasons to love garlic!

    Joanne M. Gallivan, RD, director of the National Diabetes Education Program at the National Institutes of Health, has this kitchen tip: "Garlic has been shown to have many healthful benefits, including lowering the risk for many cancers. But the way you treat it while preparing a dish can enhance its cancer-fighting properties. A recent study showed that letting garlic rest for about 10 minutes before it is used in cooking may enhance its cancer-fighting benefits. Chopping or crushing garlic helps to produce the active compounds that give it the distinct smell and healthful sulfide compounds. But heating it immediately after it is chopped inactivates the cancer-fighting properties."

    The serving size for fresh garlic is 1 clove, which has 1 gram of carb. It's a great addition to pasta sauces, stir-fries, and many shrimp dishes.

    Get two garlic recipes you'll love:

    Garlic Shrimp on Spinach

    Garlic Cashew Chicken Casserole

  • Kale

    It's no wonder the popularity of this leafy green, nonstarchy vegetable has soared in recent years: It's tasty, highly nutritious, and a versatile ingredient in the kitchen.

    The healthy secrets behind the kale trend.

    "A 1/2-cup serving of cooked kale has only 18 calories and 4 grams of carbohydrate. It contains almost all the important nutrients, from vitamin A to zinc," says Connie Crawley, RD, LD, Nutrition and Health Specialist at the University of Georgia Extension Service. "When you go to the farmer's market, there are so many varieties to choose from, you are bound to find one that you like. It can be steamed, sauteed, microwaved, or stir-fried."

    Like spinach, kale is one of those green leafy veggies associated with a reduced risk of type 2 diabetes. In one meta-analysis of several studies, people who ate the most green leafy vegetables were 14 percent less likely to develop diabetes than those consuming the least amounts.

    Kale (and spinach) contains two pigments, lutein and zeaxanthin, that are beneficial for eye health. According to Harvard's School of Public Health, sunlight, cigarette smoke, air pollution, and infections can cause free radicals to form. These two pigments seem to snuff out free radicals before they can harm the eyes' sensitive tissues. They also appear to be protective against cataracts.

    Carolyn Washburn, Extension assistant professor at Utah Sate University, has these tips for selecting, storing, and cooking with kale:

    • You can buy kale year-round. Avoid kale that has wilted, yellowed, or insect-damaged leaves. Smaller bunches will be more tender.
    • Wash kale in a vegetable wash or vinegar and water. Dry it with a paper towel, and fold in half for cutting. The spine of kale is often tough, so it is best remove it.
    • Use kale within five days of purchase. The longer you store it, the stronger and more bitter the flavor becomes. Wrap unwashed kale in damp paper towels in a plastic bag, and store in the vegetable crisper.

    Give your meals a kick with these kale creations:

    Potato-Kale Salad

    More Kale Recipes

  • Melon

    When you're craving something sweet, make tracks to the melon aisle, where you'll find many varieties including watermelon, cantaloupe, muskmelon, honeydew, casaba, crenshaw, Persian, and pepino. While all of these are bursting with healthy nutrients, the most common types contain some unique properties:

    Watermelon: Like tomatoes, watermelon is a good source of the antioxidant lycopene, which may help protect against some cancers and cell damage associated with heart disease. The American Heart Association has certified fresh watermelon for its Heart-Check program as being low in saturated fat and cholesterol. When selecting watermelon, look for ones without bruises or dents. Store whole melons at room temperature for up to 10 days. One serving is 1-1/4 cups cubed.

    Honeydew: A 1-cup serving of honeydew contains 51 percent of the daily value for vitamin C, and like other melons, it gives you a sense of fullness without a lot of calories. Select melons that feel heavy, have a slight fragrant scent, and don't have bruises or soft spots

    Cantaloupe: This succulent melon gives you a double-whammy: Cantaloupe is an excellent source of both vitamins C and A. Vitamin A supports good eye health, because it helps prevent macular degeneration and improves night vision, according to the American Diabetes Association. Look for cantaloupes that have well-defined netting, feel heavy, and have a strong odor. One serving is 1 cup cubed.

    Try these delicious melon recipes:

    Sunrise Smoothies

    Grilled Gingered-Melon Kabobs

     

  • Nuts

    In a nutshell, nuts are one of the healthiest food choices you can make. According to the Mayo Clinic, most nuts contain at least one or more of these heart-healthy substances: unsaturated fats, omega-3 fatty acids, fiber, vitamin E, plant sterols, and L-arginine, which makes artery walls more flexible and less prone to blood clots.

    Surprising facts about nuts.

    There is also increasing evidence that nuts can improve blood sugar control in type 2 diabetes. In a Canadian study published in Diabetes Care in 2011, researchers found people with type 2 diabetes who ate 2 ounces of mixed nuts daily saw a decrease in blood sugar levels and LDL (bad) cholesterol. The study was funded in part by the International Tree Nut Council Nutrition Research Foundation and the Almond Board of California, among other supporters.

    Because they don't require refrigeration and are highly portable, nuts are a great snack choice. One caution: Because nuts are high in calories, it's best to portion them before eating, rather than eating them out of a bag or can. Serving sizes:

     Almonds, cashews, or mixed nuts 6 nuts
     Peanuts    10 nuts
     Pecans      4 halves
    • Hazelnuts  5 nuts
     Pistachios 12 nuts

    Nut butters, such as peanut butter and almond butter, are other ways to enjoy nuts' health benefits. The serving size is 1 tablespoon, which also works as a meat/protein replacement.

    Avoid salted, sugared, honeyed, or chocolate-covered varieties, because they add calories, carbs, and salt.

    Get our sweet and savory nut recipes now!

  • Oatmeal

    There's nothing more comforting than a warm bowl of oatmeal in the morning. Plus, it's a more nutritious option than many other starchy breakfast foods, such as sugary cereals, sweet rolls, and bagels, according to the American Diabetes Association (ADA). Also, because of its fiber content (2 grams fiber in a 1/2-cup serving of cooked oatmeal), it gives you more staying power than low-fiber options.

    Why oatmeal is breakfast's best kept secret.

    That's not all. For years oatmeal has had an uber-healthy reputation, and for good reason. According to the American Heart Association (AHA), oats have the highest proportion of soluble fiber than any other grain, which can help lower LDL (bad) cholesterol and decrease the risk of heart disease. In addition, oatmeal was the first food the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved for carrying a specific health claim.

    The soluble fiber in oatmeal might also help blunt the rise in blood glucose by delaying stomach emptying and providing a physical barrier to digestive enzymes and absorptive surfaces, according to the professional publication Today’s Dietitian.

    There are several types of oatmeal to choose from:

    • Steel-cut oatmeal has a dense, thick texture. It can take up to 45 minutes to cook, so some people make a batch ahead of time and warm it up for an instant breakfast. These less-processed oats are lower on the glycemic index, which may help control blood sugar.
    • Old-fashioned oats are thinner and take about 5 minutes to cook.
    • Quick-cooking oatmeal and instant oatmeal are also available, but watch for added salt and sugar in these varieties.

    Jazz up your oats with these additions:

    • Stir in chopped nuts
    • Top with fresh fruit: berries, chopped apples or pears, or sliced bananas
    • Sprinkle with cinnamon
    • Add a little brown sugar substitute
    • Add a tablespoon of dried cranberries, cherries, raisins, or dates

    Whip up two treasured oatmeal recipes:

    Spiced Irish Oatmeal

    Butter Rum Oatmeal Cookies

     

  • Quinoa

    If you're interested in expanding your vegetarian options, you may want to give quinoa (pronounced KEEN- wah) a try. According to the Whole Grains Council, quinoa is an ancient grain consumed as far back as the when Inca civilization was in full swing. It was largely forgotten until it was rediscovered in the 1970s. While this "ancient grain" tastes and cooks up like as a grain, it's actually a nutrient-rich seed, says Connie Crawley, RD, LD, Nutrition and Health Specialist at the University of Georgia Extension Service.

    Tips for cooking quinoa.

    What is unique about quinoa is not so much its protein content (3 grams in every 1/3-cup serving), but its protein composition. It contains all nine essential amino acids (amino acids the body cannot make), making it a complete protein. "With 13 grams of carbs per serving, it also contributes folate, magnesium, manganese, iron, and vitamin B6 to your diet. It has 2 grams of fiber, and it is very low in sodium," Crawley says. Like other whole grain, high-fiber foods, quinoa can help prevent blood sugar spikes and stave off hunger.

    More than 150 different varieties are known, but white, red, and black quinoa are the most common types in the U.S. The tiny grains cook up quickly in about 15 minutes and are commonly served as a side dish similar to couscous or rice. The mild, nutty taste makes quinoa a good base for salads, or it can be stirred into soups.

    We love these quinoa recipes:

    Hearty Vegetable, Bacon, and Quinoa Quiche

    Mediterranean Quinoa Salad

  • Raspberries

    These little berries pack a big nutritional punch. A 1-cup serving provides over half of the day's vitamin C, a powerful antioxidant beneficial for bone and skin health, as well as cancer and heart disease prevention. Even more amazing is their fiber content: a whopping 7 grams of dietary fiber, in part due to the edible seeds.

    Learn more about antioxidant-rich raspberries!

    These delicate berries are also rich in anthocyanins, which give red raspberries their color and antioxidant power. In addition, raspberries contain ellagic acid, which along with other components in raspberries has been studied for its effects on insulin resistance, lowering blood sugar, and countering inflammation.

    Raspberries make the American Diabetic Association's list of superfoods and have the American Heart Association's endorsement. Enjoy red, black, and gold raspberries plain or in salads and smoothies.

    Rave-worthy raspberry recipes include:

    Berries with Custard Sauce

    Brownie Raspberry Tart

  • Red Grapefruit

    Sweet, juicy, and delicious, ruby red grapefruit packs more antioxidant power and more health benefits than white grapefruit. In a 30-day test of 57 people with heart disease, those who ate one red grapefruit daily decreased their LDL (bad) cholesterol by 20 percent and triglycerides by 17 percent. In contrast, those who ate a white grapefruit reduced LDL by 10 percent with no significant change in triglycerides compared with a group who didn't eat the fruit.

    What you must know about grapefruit.

    Grapefruit also seems to help improve HDL (good) cholesterol levels. In a recent study, individuals who consumed fresh grapefruit or grapefruit juice before meals had a 6-8 percent increase in HDL (good) cholesterol compared with the control group, which drank water before meals. Grapefruit juice has also been shown to help lower blood pressure in people with both normal and high blood pressure.

    This vitamin-C-rich fruit contains soluble fiber and also makes the American Diabetes Association's list of superfoods. Enjoy it plain and in salads and salsas.

    One cautionary note: Grapefruit can interact with certain drugs, including statin and antiarrhythmic medications, so check with your health care professional before consuming the fruit.

    Half of a large grapefruit, or 3/4 cup of sections, counts as one serving.

    Make these refreshing recipes using red or pink grapefruit:

    Orange-Grapefruit Cobbler

    Citrus Turkey Spinach Salad

  • Red Onions

    Don't hold the onions -- especially red ones. They not only add great color to salads, burgers, and sandwiches, but they also score higher in antioxidant power compared with their yellow and white cousins.

    Onions are also a good source of fiber, potassium, and folate -- all good for heart health. Onions' high flavonoid content also puts them on the map for cancer and cardiovascular research as well as other chronic diseases, such as asthma. According to a 2002 study in The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, having a high dietary intake of the flavonoid quercetin found in onions may lower the risk of these chronic illnesses.

    One serving of this nonstarchy vegetable is 1/2 cup raw or 1/4 cup cooked. If you love onions but not the lingering scent on your breath, try chewing on a few springs of parsley or a mint leaf.

    Try these brag-worthy recipes featuring red onions:

    Pine Nut-Crusted Cod with Caramelized Onions and Tomatoes

    Grilled Red Onions and Corn Salad with Roasted Red Pepper Vinaigrette

  • Red Peppers

    Red peppers are actually green peppers that have been allowed to ripen on the vine longer. They're loaded with nutrients, including the antioxidants vitamin C and beta-carotene. Like other red fruits and vegetables, red peppers deliver a healthy dose of lycopene. Vitamins A and C, along with lycopene, promote good health and reduce the risk of heart disease, diabetes, and some cancers, according to the National Institutes of Health (NIH). In fact, in the NIH's eating guide for seniors, red sweet peppers are listed as one of four veggies with the highest amounts of antioxidants; the others are spinach, carrots, and tomatoes.

    Why red peppers are better for you than green peppers.

    You may be tempted to rely on a multivitamin or supplements for these nutrients, but research has shown that supplements do not always function as well as whole foods.

    Need another reason to choose this nonstarchy vegetable? The serving size for raw peppers is a whole cup. That's a lot of food! A serving of cooked or roasted red peppers is 1/2 cup. Strips of raw peppers are highly portable -- they can go in the lunch box or in your carry-on when flying. They're also a colorful addition on an appetizer tray and pair well with many dips.

    In addition to eating peppers fresh, they can be added to pastas, eggs, and stir-fries. Roasting is another delicious preparation. Simply place whole peppers on a broiling pan, broil on each side about 4 inches away from heat until slightly charred, then place peppers in a plastic bag. When cool, peel skin and remove seeds and membranes. The roasted peppers are ready to use in sauces, dips, and other dishes.

    Red sweet pepper dishes to savor:

    Stuffed Red Peppers

    Red Pepper-Basil Raviolettis

  • Soy

    Regardless of the form, soy products have a deserved reputation for providing high-quality protein that is low in saturated fat and cholesterol. In fact, soy is a great way to help meet the 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommendation to "replace protein foods that are high in solids fats (such as many meats) with choices that are lower in solid fats and calories."

    The one soy product you should avoid.

    Soy is also a source of niacin, folate, zinc, potassium, iron, and alpha-linolenic acid (ALA), a fatty acid that can be converted into omega-3 fatty acids. Edamame is also high in fiber with 4 grams per serving.

    Health authorities once thought eating soy was a silver bullet for reducing serum cholesterol levels. Most have concluded these foods' effects may not be as significant, but they agree soy is still beneficial, especially when used as a replacement for high-fat meats. In fact, the American Diabetes Association has suggested setting a goal of eating at least two meatless meals each week.

    There are no shortage of soy options today:
    (Note: Serving sizes are given in parentheses.)

    • Soy milk (1 cup) and soy cheese (1 ounce) are now dairy-aisle staples.

    • Tofu, or bean curd (4 ounces), made from curdled soy milk, can be eaten in salads or stir-fries, or used as an ingredient in cooking. Silken tofu (1/2 cup) is a softer form of tofu that can be used to make sauces and desserts requiring a thick, creamy texture.

    • Most grocery stores carry a variety of soy-base meat substitutes, such as veggie burgers (3 ounces), sausage (2 links), imitation-beef crumbles (2 ounces), and imitation-chicken nuggets (2 nuggets).

    • Edamame  (1/2 cup) are immature soybeans popular on appetizer menus.

    • Soy nuts (3/4 ounce) are soybeans that have been roasted and sometimes flavored.

    New to soy? Try these easy and delicious recipes:

    Creamy Edamame-Veggie Soup

    Udon Noodles with Tofu

  • Spinach

    Popeye was right -- spinach is good for you. You probably already know that it's loaded with vitamins and minerals. A 1-cup serving of raw spinach or 1/2 cup cooked provides over 50 percent of the daily value for folate and vitamin C. At the same time, a serving of this nonstarchy vegetable is super low in calories (7) and carbohydrate (1 gram). A ½-cup cooked serving contains just 22 calories and 4 grams of carb.

    Creative ways to eat spinach!

    This leafy green veggie is high in beta-carotene, an antioxidant the body uses to make vitamin A. Beta-carotene also protects cells from free-radical damage, which contributes to chronic illnesses and aging.

    Need another reason to fit more spinach into your meal plan? The American Diabetes Association (ADA) reported on a study to determine whether eating more fruits and veggies can lower the risk of developing diabetes. The answer? People who ate more green leafy vegetables (including spinach in particular) reduced their chances of developing type 2 diabetes by 14 percent. Despite some limitations of the study, the ADA's takeway was this: "People who want to lower their chances for developing diabetes should consider eating more green leafy vegetables."

    Spinach is widely available in both fresh and frozen forms. It's not only great in salads, but it can be lightly steamed, sauteed, added to scrambled eggs, or used to make vegetarian lasagna.

     

  • Tea

    The next time you pour yourself a cup of tea, you could be doing your health a favor. Tea contains antioxidant-rich flavonoids called catechins, which seem to reduce the risk of heart disease by helping blood vessels dilate, according to the American Diabetes Association (ADA). Tea also has been shown to improve cholesterol levels, alleviate stress, and reduce the risk of a number of cancers.

    Find out more about the health advantages of tea!

    So do you choose green or black? According to the ADA, while green tea has been the darling in the tea world, the health benefits of green and black teas are similar, says Jeffrey Blumberg, Ph.D., FACN, director of the Antioxidants Research Laboratory at the Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging at Tufts University. In the ADA article on tea, Mayer recommends drinking four to five cups of strong tea daily. But beware: Bottled teas don't count, because the beneficial catechins begin degrading once tea has been brewed, and the drinks could be hiding added sugars. Also, too much ice may dilute tea and its healthy compounds. Tea has only about half the caffeine of coffee.

    Here are a couple of teas to curl up with:

    Ginger-Lemon Tea

    Spiced Pear Tea

  • Tomatoes

    Tomatoes are an excellent source of vitamins C and A, plus they are rich in lycopene, a powerful antioxidant. You've probably heard that lycopene-rich tomato products might help protect against certain cancers, particularly prostate cancer. The new news is that increased intake of lycopene is also associated with a significantly decreased risk for heart disease, according to a 2013 report from researchers at Tufts University.

    Which tomatoes are best: red, yellow, or orange?

    It is easier for your body to absorb lycopene from cooked and processed tomatoes, such as tomato juice, than from fresh tomatoes. Also, canned products such as tomato paste, tomato sauce, and pasta sauce have approximately seven times more lycopene than raw tomatoes. Adding a bit of oil while sauteing or cooking tomatoes can aid lycopene absorption, according to Health Gourmet: Eat to Beat Diabetes (McGraw-Hill, 2006).

    Tomatoes have also been shown to combat inflammation due to nutrients such as carotenoids and bioflavonoids -- that can help to lower the risk or heart disease, which causes a third of all deaths in the United States.

    While cooked tomatoes and tomato products contain more lycopene, raw tomatoes are still an excellent choice and loaded with vitamins and minerals. They are classified as nonstarchy vegetables, while pasta and spaghetti sauces are classified as starchy vegetables. "Unfortunately, many canned tomato products are high in salt. Now low-sodium versions of these products are available. You'll find these low-sodium tomato products substitute beautifully in your recipes and cut your salt intake significantly," says Connie Crawley, RD, LD, Nutrition and Health Specialist at the University of Georgia Extension Service.

    Get our best tomato recipes!

  • Yogurt

    Yogurt is a sweet treat that is creamy, delicious, and good for you. It's an excellent source of calcium, which helps promote healthy bones and teeth, as well as good muscle and blood vessel function. It is also a good source of vitamin B2 (riboflavin) and protein. 

    The best yogurts to choose; plus yogurts to avoid!

    Probiotic yogurts contain health-promoting bacteria beneficial for digestive health, including aiding lactose intolerance and irritable bowel syndrome. They also support healthy immune function.

    A study published in 2012 in The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition showed that consuming cheese or yogurt might help prevent type 2 diabetes. In studying the diets of thousands of adults with and without diabetes, investigators found those who ate at least 55 grams (about 2 ounces) of yogurt a day were 12 percent less likely to develop type 2. The researchers theorized that probiotic bacteria in yogurt lowers cholesterol and produces certain vitamins that prevent diabetes. They thought the vitamin D, calcium, and magnesium found in yogurt could play a role, too.  

    When buying yogurt, the American Diabetes Association recommends opting for low-fat or fat-free products. Another option in the marketplace is Greek yogurt, which is strained yogurt with some of the liquid removed. Greek yogurt is higher in protein than regular yogurt. Again, look for Greek yogurt that is low-fat or fat-free without added sugar. Check the label for total carbs so you can work it into your meal plan.

    Find winning yogurts that have been taste-tested and dietitian-approved!

    Read Now! 22 Foods to Avoid with Diabetes!

Diabetic Living Video

Comments

Loading comments...